Archive: a work in which to invest. Protection and promotion, this is what the producers and the consumers of art are ask for. But it’s not just that.

“Give me concrete answers” (Gipi, 2014). This is the incipit of a graphic novel recently published, where the protagonist is a writer in crisis hospitalized in a psychiatric ward.

The demand for “concrete” answers is influenced by cultural disorientation that involves various areas, whit no exception for the art. News reports related to the market (as the Balloon Dog by Jeff Koons sold for $ 58 million at Christie’s) help to create the idea of a system obscure to the most part of the people.
The work of art is a complex good and its market is inherently uncertain and unclear, as the discipline that regulates it.

The market, museums and collections are the forces that determine and enable the operation of the art system. The fundamental rule that guarantees the mechanism is the validity of the certificate of authenticity.

The big matter to be faced today, in order to understand market and society, is how the archive and the historical memory in the contemporary work and how both protection and promotion are inherently linked to them.
Compared with the “abstracts” results, often speculative, of the art market, there is a world of archives, foundations, associations that continue a “concrete” committement of conservation, enhancement and divulgation.

Concept sketch for The Museum of Modern Art. View of the Sculpture Garden entrance on 54th Street. © 2014 Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Mytemplart Magazine

Concept sketch for The Museum of Modern Art. View of the Sculpture Garden entrance on 54th Street. © 2014 Diller Scofidio + Renfro

These are the questions we must answer to find the chief points of the art system: what is today the role of the art archive, public and private, historicized and contemporary artists? How do the auction houses and art dealers work in the field of protection and promotion? What are the needs of transparency and confidentiality? What is the role of art critics, colleges and universities in this system?

Finally, the computer systems allow us to archive everything. How can an emerging artist to promote and protect his own artwork, to insert himself or herself in such varied and complex landscape? And we, observers and interpreters of this system, how can we give a clear point of view about these issues? Therefore, what to do?
And us, observers and interpreters of this system, how can we make a clear point of view on these issues?

We have to accept the challenge brought by the new technologies; we have to flow more freely opinions, experiences, feelings and aspirations, creating debates and not monologues. We have to return to look to the world of the educational, because the artistic taste is no longer the product of an educational scheme imposed by the teaching, but the result of a contamination of languages that increasingly depends on the interaction of tendencies sometimes opposed.

The challenge of contemporaneity is, as often happens, to go beyond these apparent contradictions and reach a new synthesis.

Man Ray. Laboratory of the Future. 1935. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/16 x 7″ (23.1 x 17.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of James Johnson Sweeney © 2014 Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Man Ray. Laboratory of the Future. 1935. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/16 x 7″ (23.1 x 17.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of James Johnson Sweeney © 2014 Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

The archive is a space of necessary reflection from where to start and explore themes of general interest, such as the various procedures for archiving and authenticating, the new artistic techniques, the problem of false and therefore the economic value of the artistic object.
MyTemplArt Magazine was born from the desire to promote a genuine cultural project: to create a shared consciousness about the archive as a basis for further art. Through a map of art’s archives, like a trip in different stations, we will take you, from time to time, to shine the spotlight on some of the experiences of interest in and outside Europe, large and small, born from public and private initiativs.
The first number of MytemplArt Magazine discover Italian institutions, the Diocesan Museum in Milan and the Foundation Giulio Paolini in Turin. It will show the new face of the Charterhouse of Parma, to which Stendhal has dedicated his famous syndrome. It will introduce you to collectors who have created institutions to protect the work of living artists, and will have a look at the asian art market. It will present you the point of view of the artists and investigate examples of educational systems in Milan and London.
We want to offer a magazine that addresses art’s world spaces and society and we want to give a structure to different realities, supporting a culture that wants to operate deliberately in clear and understandable terms. We support the culture that creates development and the one that buildS a bridge between domains of sense that until a moment before seemed difficult to connect. A theme that has something to share with the birth of this new journal. Welcome.

This post is also available in: Italian