One of the recurrent themes of the past months is the worrying proliferation of news related to the presence of fakes in the art market.

Experts of Geneva Fine Art Expert Institute (FAEI) estimate that half of the works in circulation are fakes – a number hard to confirm but probably it is an underestimate, says Yann Walther, head of the Institute. Indeed, among 70 and 90 percent of the artworks analyzed by FAEI is a fake.
“When you buy a flat, you always get an appraisal first. But in the art world, until recently, you could buy works for 10 million euros without sufficient documentation,” says FAEI chief Yann Walther ( Source: artdaily.com).Within a deep hard view, it is clear that the issue of artwork documentation and certification play a leading role for the protection of its value.
We must realise that the preservation of the identity and authenticity of the artwork is made possible not only by the protection of the physical object during the time, but also by the quality of information, of archiving and of instructions coming straight from the artist.
The most frequently asked question to technology is now focussed on a potential support in terms of archiving, for preserving the public and private artistic heritage.

Fine Arts Expert Institute head scientist Killian Anheuser tests painting ascribed to Fernand Léger. Photo: Richard Juilliart/AFP

Fine Arts Expert Institute head scientist Killian Anheuser tests painting ascribed to Fernand Léger. Photo: Richard Juilliart/AFP

Deianira Amico

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